Letter: Dirt Roads Should be Honored, Preserved

There are certain iconic images which we hold onto as representing who we are and what we believe. The Statue of Liberty comes to mind. A symbol of our great nation which serves to keep us here and attract visitors from near and far. Dirt roads are an iconic image for many who live and visit us in Philipstown — “where the country begins.”

There was a workshop presentation at Town Hall on June 15 which served to remind me what dirt roads represent to me. When we purchased in Philipstown, on a dirt road, we wanted to be “off the beaten path.” We couldn’t imagine living in “suburbia.” I think that feeling continues for many, both residents and visitors. Dirt roads are to me an inextricable part of our value system which includes respect for and accepting that we are a part of our natural environment.

I love Main Street, being able to have a great meal 10 minutes from the house, that we can spend a lazy weekend afternoon enjoying the shops and take a leisurely stroll to the river. Those places that we value are on paved roads. We luckily do not have to choose between paved and dirt roads.

At the workshop, if what I understood is correct, dirt roads can be well maintained  — economically. There is a science to it — and it’s not hard to understand — I think I got it.

We should honor, preserve and protect our dirt roads — for who we are and where we choose to live.

John Greener, Garrison


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