Sculpture Show Leaves Saunders Farm

Eulogy to the Earthworm

“Eulogy to the Earthworm,” by Gianni Biaggi

After 14 years, moves from Garrison to Brewster

After 14 autumns at Saunders Farm in Garrison, the Collaborative Concepts outdoor sculpture show will move this year to Tilly Foster Farm, a county-owned historic site near Brewster, where it opens on Saturday (Sept. 5).

Based in Putnam Valley, Collaborative Concepts, a nonprofit dedicated to presenting professional art to the community, said that the county tourism agency invited the group to relocate to Tilly Foster, which covers 200 acres.

Dell Jones, a Collaborative Concepts representative, said on Wednesday (Sept. 2) that, among other attractions, Tilly Foster offers ample space for visitors to roam safely, a concern in a year of pandemic.

“It has to do with social distancing,” she said. “That was the most important thing.”

Fecund Pod by Linda Sheridan

“Fecund Pod,” by Linda Sheridan

Along with the spacious setting, Jones said that “Putnam County thought it was a perfect match. We look forward to a good show with good attendance.”

The county has been trying to draw visitors to the farm, which includes hiking trails; scenic vistas; a community garden; animals, including pigs, alpacas, miniature horses and chickens; and the farm-to-table Tilly’s Table restaurant, which is open each week from Thursday to Sunday.

In relocating, Collaborative Concepts said in a statement that it “hopes to retain its traditional patrons while attracting new visitors from Putnam, Dutchess, Westchester and Connecticut.” (Tilly Foster is near the Connecticut border.)

“If you have been longing to see art in person rather than virtually, this is your chance,” the organization said.

Shift by Linda Schmidt

“Shift,” by Linda Schmidt

The annual installation had taken place at Saunders Farm on Old Albany Post Road in Garrison since its debut in 2006. Collaborative Concepts thanked Sandy and Shelley Saunders “for their years of hospitality and generosity” in hosting the two-month show on their property.

This year the show is built around two themes — the pandemic and nature — and features the work of 40 artists, including “Shelter in Place,” a sculpture made from trees by Anna Adler and Rudy Vavra; larger-than-life hanging fiber flowers by Kris Campbell; Chuck Von Schmidt’s “Penguins”; Natalya Khorover’s plastic “Speaking of Birds”; “Winter Bird” by Justin Perlman; and “Sheep,” made of wire and steel wool by Hildreth Potts.

campbell

Kris Campbell with his moving sculpture, “#iamORANGE.”

The abstract art includes painted geometric sculptures by Max Yawney and Peter Schlemowitz and “a spiritual sculpture” called “Four Directions” by Chris Froehlich. In addition, Swiss artist Gianni Biaggi created a sculpture called “Eulogy to the Earthworm.”

Collaborative Concepts says it allows artists “to create whatever they want,” whether grand, silly or experimental, and also “gives them permission to fail.”

Tilly Foster Farm is located at 100 Route 312 in Brewster. The Tilly Foster Farm Project 2020 is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Wednesday and from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Thursday to Sunday, through Oct. 31. Admission is free, and most works are for sale, with prices ranging from $400 to $50,000. Visitors are asked to wear masks and practice social distancing. No pets are allowed. See collaborativeconcepts.org or call 845-528-1797.


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