Sales Tax Revenue Grows, Except in Putnam

Local sales tax collections across New York totaled $16.6 billion in 2017, according to the state comptroller, an increase of 3.9 percent.

Sales tax revenue grew in every county except Putnam, where it fell by 0.45 percent, to $58.8 million. This was due, the state said, to corrections made to the county’s initial 2016 and 2017 filings.

Dutchess County saw a 2.79 percent increase in revenue, to $183 million.


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One thought on “Sales Tax Revenue Grows, Except in Putnam

  1. If Putnam County wants to increase sales tax revenue, there is at least one very simple answer: invest some of the money they confiscate from the merchants and business owners into promoting tourism in Cold Spring.

    There are very good reasons why the county will never share sales tax with the local municipalities and I have no argument about that. However, in lieu of revenue sharing, the county owes the village a host of services, specifically when it comes to the Visitors’ Bureau, which is the tourism agency for the county.

    As it stands now, there is not one local official, including District 1 Legislator Scuccimarra, who is advocating on behalf of our incredible Main Street businesses! Why is that? Can it be laziness or incompetence, or perhaps a bit of both?

    Thanks to Amazon and other E-commerce platforms, small retail businesses like ours are becoming dinosaurs, soon to be extinct. However, even in this environment, Cold Spring merchants are still hanging in there, as witnessed by the low vacancy rate and the number of new, upscale merchants who’ve opened businesses.

    It’s long past time for the legislature to earmark at least $500,000 specifically to fund tourism efforts for the Village. This is a tiny amount in comparison to the sales tax revenue that is being generated for county government that does very little for the taxpayers.