Parking Permits Expanded

A proposed village tree ordinance will soon go to a public hearing. (File photo by M. Turton)

No outdoor water use in Cold Spring

By Michael Turton

A law signed by Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Sept. 25 gave the Village of Cold Spring the authority to expand its parking-permit program. Trustee Cathryn Fadde had spearheaded the effort to expand the permit program, which previously applied only to residents west of the Metro-North train tracks and required state approval to change.

The program will take in most streets east of the tracks. including Furnace Street, Garden Street, High Street, Kemble Avenue from Main Street to Wall Street, Railroad Avenue, Stone Street, Church Street, Haldane Street, Rock Street, Cross Street and Northern Avenue. Residents on those streets who have permits will be exempt from time limits. Main Street, Fair Street and Depot Square are excluded.

The Parking Committee, chaired by Anthony Phillips, will begin implementation at its Oct. 14 meeting. Fadde, who previously chaired the committee, said a public hearing would be scheduled to review the program details.

The legislation, now Chapter 341 of the Laws of New York State, was co-sponsored by Assemblywoman Sandy Galef and Sen. Sue Serino. “The residents of Cold Spring have been facing very difficult parking problems in the waterfront area of the village, as I have come to understand, since many came to me to complain and see what could be done at the state level,” Galef said in a statement. “Hopefully this new parking system will assure the local residents of a place to park in front of their homes while encouraging the many tourists to park in public parking lots, and commuters to park at the train station.”

Reservoir levels falling

Mandatory water conservation measures are now in effect in Cold Spring. Trustees decided to restrict water use, effective immediately, in light of seriously decreased water levels in the village reservoirs near Lake Surprise Road, brought about by less-than-average rainfall that sent levels plummeting to 58 percent from 90 percent.

The ban prohibits any outdoor use of water, including watering lawns and washing vehicles. Violations can be fined up to $150. The Village Board had previously called for voluntary conservation.


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