2012 Cold Spring Farmers' Market Outdoor Season moving to Boscobel

Season opener is May 12; market-goers can enjoy free access to grounds and trails

The Cold Spring Farmers’ Market (CSFM) and Boscobel House and Gardens are jointly announcing that the market will be moving to the grounds of the Boscobel when it moves outdoors on May 12, 2012.

As development plans proceeded at the Butterfield site this year, the Cold Spring Farmers’ Market was looking for a new home.  In taking into account both the desires of their farmer vendors and shoppers, the CSFM was looking for an inviting, safe location that was visible and easily accessible throughout the outdoor season for the Cold Spring community.  The parking lot on the Boscobel grounds exactly fits the bill with plenty of space to locate the market, easy access and parking, and space to picnic.

Boscobel will be offering all visitors free access to their grounds every Saturday when they reopen on April 1 so that shoppers can include a walk out to the river view or a hike on the woodland trail along with their shopping experience at the Cold Spring Farmers’ Market. Both organizations are excited that this new partnership will bring a great experience and new visitors to the Market and to Boscobel House and Gardens.

Saturday, May 12 is the seasonal opening of the Cold Spring Outdoor Farmers’ Market. Open 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. every Saturday, the Market provides shoppers with the opportunity to enjoy locally grown food and to support regional farms. The outdoor market will operate through Nov. 17.

The house at Boscobel

Purchasing directly from farms helps keep them in the Hudson Valley. Vendors at the Outdoor Farmers’ Market are farmers or food artisans sourcing local farms for ingredients. The CSFM has a great mix of vendors and product to help this become a regular stop during market rounds, in planning weekly menus, or just stopping by for a few favorites and a quick bite to eat. If you haven’t visited the market before, come to the Cold Spring/Garrison area and enjoy a Saturday with an excellent selection of local and tasty delights and now … beautiful views, too!

The CSFM stocks: produce, fish, meats, breads, fruits, preserves, cheeses, pastas, syrups, sauces, honey, savory pastries, plants, flowers, coffee, pops, wines, ciders, and great prepared foods if you want to eat locally, but just don’t have the time or energy to cook.

In addition to the free grounds on Saturdays, Boscobel offers their acclaimed docent-led tours, a newly-refurbished museum shop, the Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival ticket office as well as a broad array of new, and familiar, programming, including concerts, lectures, tastings and events for families.

For directions, more info on the vendors and their product offerings and vendor links, and more information, please visit CSFM website. For more information on Boscobel House and Gardens, located at 1609 Route 9D, please visit the Boscobel website.


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9 thoughts on “2012 Cold Spring Farmers' Market Outdoor Season moving to Boscobel

  1. How exciting! Shopping for local produce and enjoying the grounds of Boscobel at the same time. Just the motivation I need to get up early on Saturday morning.

  2. How can that be? I was under the understanding that they were operating under the villages insurance policy. Correct me if i am wrong. If they move from the village I feel it will be a great loss for them as well as the village. I for one and a number of other people i have spoken to are not going to take the chance of walking or biking with or without children down 9d especially on a saturday morning. Well i guess i can burn some gas to get there. But that some what defeats the fun of traveling there. Who dropped the ball on this one! After all it is the Cold Spring Farmers Market. Cant they fing another home within the village?

  3. I understand that there were some obstacles with finding a location in the village, but this is very disappointing news. The market will be moving from a location where the majority of the customers could walk and shop to a location where essentially everyone has to drive. Unfortunately, 9d is not exactly a family friendly bicycling road, especially on summer Saturdays. This will probably cut the number of farmers market trips our family makes by half or more. I hope that the vendors can succeed.

    To me this looks like a marketing success for Boscobel and a failure for the market’s customers.

  4. I’m also disappointed by this move. Since there’s no usable bike route from Cold Spring to Boscobel, I’ll no longer be able to shop at the market. Everyone will suffer from the increased traffic on 9D. We have to get away from the assumption that increasing private car travel is a solution. Instead, it represents failure.

  5. The comments here are yet another example of why some kind of safe bicycle/pedestrian corridor between Cold Spring and Beacon is desperately needed. I really hope the DOT and the Philipstown, Cold Spring and Nelsonville Boards can get behind this and make it happen. In the meantime, way to go Aaron! Let’s all get on the trolley!

  6. I think Tony Bardes initial question of whose going to insure the Farmer’s Market at Boscobel is a valid one. Has the Village of Cold Spring been providing their insurance coverage while the market was hosted down at the Capuchin (outside of Village limits)?

    I agree with Lynn Miller that a bike path is desperately needed, but most bike paths in NYS have been constructed on abandoned rail line right of ways. Since Metro North isn’t going anywhere, and any adjacent pedestrian use along their current active lines would require security fencing along 9d…i’m not getting my hopes up.

  7. Ok, so it’s moved, and you have to drive there. I know this was the only site left for them to use. IF it did not end up there, it would not have continued. This is information directly heard from board member of the market. Yes, a lot of folks (who lived in the village), walked there, what about those who do/did not live in the village, did not see anyone with jetpacks buying local produce…… It might not the ideal location, but it still is a location.